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Johnny_B_Goode 2019-11-05 15:21:14
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Johnny_B_Goode 2020-08-28 17:34:56
They're NOT silicone insulated cables (hence only the four star rating for not being precisely as described). I set my KSGER T12 soldering station to 200 deg C and gently stroked the tip against the croc clip end of the black cable which left a slightly flattened imprint showing that the insulation had softened and then set in an altered shape. I had already verified that the soldering iron's own silicone cable was the real deal by doing the same test. Although the insulation on the black banana to croc clip lead did soften and alter its shape, I couldn't detect any odour of melted PVC. The insulation might not be PVC but it sure as Hell Fire ain't silicone. Other than that, the cables are fine for use with 10 amp rated bench supplies. As others have done, I strung all five in series and shorted my 10A bench supply with them. I had to turn the voltage up to around the 2v mark before I was able to set a 10A current limit. I measured the volt drop across each section (avoiding inclusion of the inter lead contact resistance between each section). This was a quick test a few days ago. I didn't take any notes other than to work out a dissipation of 7W at 20A for each 1 metre lead which at 70mW per centimetre, I figured would warm the cable a little but not enough to immediately damage the insulation. By that reckoning, 15A will produce just under 40mW per centimetre and 10A, a mere 17.5mW/cm which might just be detectable as a modest warming over an hour or so of such abuse. From that one key 7W loss at 20A figure I'd managed to make a mental note of, it seems the resistance per lead is 17.5milli Ohms (175mV at the 10A test current I'd used) this value is in fairly close agreement with the figures obtained by others who had bothered to measure the resistance of their own leads. As long as you keep in mind that they're NOT silicone insulated, they'll be fine for use with a 10A rated bench supply. For 15 or 20A supplies, you'd best run your own test to be safe.
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Johnny_B_Goode 2020-08-28 15:33:05
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Johnny_B_Goode An interesting use of the phrase, "Works great" ;-) . . . . . . . . I guess you must have been attracted by the "Get double review points if you are one of the first 3 reviews published!" promise and decided to play it 'safe'. , , , , , I'm assuming you're a well seasoned BG products reviewer in making this assumption. ;-) , , , , , , , JBG 2020-07-02

Bal 2020-06-08 02:10:26
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Johnny_B_Goode 2020-07-01 08:42:07
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Johnny_B_Goode After 8 months of use, I can now recommend it both for durability and its excellent (perhaps just a little TOO excellent) non-slip properties. When cleaning the debris of solder blobs and splashes and bits of wire off, it's best to use a stiffish paint brush since the usual sweep with a bare hand that was so effective with my much abused anti-static mat, meets with very high resistance from its high friction surface. The more stubborn solder blobs and splashes are readily loosened and moved by using the brush pointed in the direction of motion (i.e. the "wrong way round"). When using the brush this way, it's best to support the bristles in your hand (I use a 2 1/2 inch pure bristle paintbrush for this task). Once the debris is loosened off, a gentle brushing motion with the bristles vertical will allow you to sweep it to the edge and into a suitably placed receptacle (i.e. a waste paper bin). The moulded depressions for temporarily placing screws and parts have proved surprisingly effective in this intended function - some parts having remained stored "temporarily" for many months in some cases! :-) In short, it has proved well worth the money. JBG

Johnny_B_Goode 2019-11-05 20:01:42
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Johnny_B_Goode 2020-07-01 08:35:53
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Johnny_B_Goode 2020-07-01 08:35:53
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Johnny_B_Goode 2020-06-30 16:01:45
This is the tougher cousin to the 1.3A (1.2MHz switching) version. Whilst the voltage adjustment pot seems to be of reasonable quality compared to the crap ones used on the "Geekcreit® Mini DC-DC Converter Step Down Module" (and its clones), unless you need an in between oddball voltage setting (6 or 7.5 volts for example) and have the patience to finesse it onto the required voltage setting - it's very touchy, you'd be better off cutting the trace (at its necked point) which bridges the Adj option solder blob link (you can still blob this link if you need to restore the Adj option) and solder blob the required standard voltage option link. Cutting the Adj option bridging link so you can choose a fixed voltage setting is a safer option - no risk of the trimpot falling apart or going open circuit to over-volt whatever 3.3 or 5 volt rail you're powering with just one volt short of whatever the input supply voltage happens to be (12 to 24 volts perhaps?). Testing the fixed 5v option gave me a tad less than 5 volt (4.95 something volts). Ideally, I wanted a voltage between 5.2 and 5.3 volts so tried blobbing both the 9 and 12 volt option bridges instead which gave me 5.31 volts - right on the money as far as I was concerned. :-) These "3A" versions run a lot cooler compared to the "1.3A" version when testing with a one amp load so should be more robust than their 'weaker cousins' whose overheating/overloading protection seems somewhat lacking since I manage to make a 1.3A one start emitting its magic smoke due to a 5v CMOS RRO dual opamp shorting out the 5v supply rail in a Mark II version of a DIY GPSDO I had been testing (most likely a design error on my part, now since remedied). The specs mention 20mV of ripple noise which will be the RMS value. The peak to peak value will be approximately three times this value, circa 60mV p2p which is quite good and easily reduced to less than 10mV p2p with additional filtering if needed. JBG
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Johnny_B_Goode 2020-06-30 16:01:45
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Johnny_B_Goode 2019-12-02 20:01:50
This arrived just 8 days after ordering it (along with the LC meter I'd also ordered separately so I'd have a stream of goodies arriving in the post this December - another LCR tester, terminal blocks for the LC meter and two types of DC-DC converter modules). The kit was complete down to the last nut and bolt and a 220nF test cap. No instructions but none were needed for "a genius like wot I am" ;-) Mind you, a printed basic construction guide would have been handy. It was only after sticking the front panel sticker onto the case that it became obvious I should have pre-drilled a 4mm dia hole for the red led to shine through before sticking it down. I landed up replacing that feeble red led with a blue led and used a 1/4 inch twist drill to carefully thin out the plastic under the sticker sufficiently to achieve a visible power on indication (blue is less attenuated by the blue/green sticker material). The red led drops about 1.9v versus the 2.9v of a blue LED but wasn't a problem to the power on circuit even at the rather precise minimum of 5.50v it requires. Indeed, it helped reduce the current consumption by a couple of mA (down to circa 22mA @9v) so it's a good idea to use a blue LED, mounted as close to the underside of the front panel if you want to avoid putting a hole in the front panel sticker (just pre-drilling the case to maximise visibility of this indicator rather than having to take great care to avoid damaging the sticker when thinning out the plastic as I'd been obliged to do). I did this more for the aesthetics rather than for its function since the LCD does this job quite nicely anyway. All in all, I'm quite impressed by its performance, particularly in determining which of my collection of recovered electrolytics are worth keeping & which need to be scrapped. The quality was only let down by the lack of a hole for the power led to shine through the top cover & the rather fiddly nylon spacer arrangement for securing the board.
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Johnny_B_Goode 2019-12-02 18:07:53
A nice DIY electronic project, spoilt by excluding the 3 terminal CUT connector block from the BOM (4* value rating) and the -ve clearance between the display panel and the barrel power connector which needed an SMD resistor on the LCD to be shifted & the top of the barrel socket to be filed down (4* quality rating). It would add value NOT not to skimp on the terminal block. I had to order a pack of ten just in case the better alternative of a 3 gang ZIF socket, turns into a hunt for Unicorn Droppings. I can see the validity in choosing a terminal block as a cheap way to minimise stray reactances and achieve a reliable connection to the CUT though. I bought this for its capability of measuring Ls & Cs as low as 1pF and 0.01μH which the other testers just won't touch. It was only after assembling it (which had been a straight forward soldering up exercise) that I felt the lack of a suitable enclosure to house the finished board. Banggood don't appear to have any suitable project boxes on offer for this kit and trawling through all 29 pages of reviews failed to find any suggestions (not even a Thingiverse 3D printer file). I'm now looking further afield (Ebay or Amazon) for a suitable enclosure or possibly even design one that my son-in-law can print out for me on his recently upgraded 3D printer. I connected it to my bench supply to measure its power requirements which vary from a low of 26.5mA on the CEx scale maxing out to 91mA on the CEx >500μF scale when measuring a 1000μF cap. It requires a minimum of 6.8v and I'd be leery of using more than 16 volts. . The relays alone account for 40mA (luckily only one at a time). The TO220 packaged 7805 is obviously not an LDV type! TO220 packaged devices typically have a free air dissipation rating of 2W max. Here, sticking to a 1W limit means using no more than a 16V DC supply to be safe and a 9 to 12 V @200mA min rated wallwart will be an ideal power source (it's not 'battery friendly').
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